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Getting Started

When should you start saving for retirement? As soon as you can. Start saving today and discover the benefits of contributing to your workplace savings plan.

You can see the effects of saving early

Here's how time and compounding impact a $5,000 pretax yearly contribution when saving starts at various ages.

This hypothetical example assumes the following: (1) $5,000 annual contributions on January 1 of each year for the age ranges shown, (2) an annual rate of return of 7%, and (3) no taxes on any earnings within the qualified retirement plan. The ending values do not reflect taxes, fees, or inflation. If they did, amounts would be lower. Earnings and pre-tax contributions from qualified retirement plans are subject to taxes when withdrawn. Qualified retirement plan distributions before age 59½ may also be subjected to a 10% penalty. Systematic investing does not ensure a profit and does not protect against loss in a declining market. This example is for illustrative purposes only and does not represent the performance of any security.

Take your first step. Confidently.

Starting down the path to saving for your retirement may be easier than you think: Begin by enrolling in your workplace savings plan. That's it. You don't have to be a financial guru. It won't take long at all to set up.


Taking that first step to enroll is important for a number of reasons. The earlier you start saving, the more time your money has to grow. That's called compounding, and it can really help you reach your retirement savings goals.


You'll also gain a sense of achievement and maybe even some momentum to take the next step, whether it's getting back on track after an event in your life has slowed your savings, or creating a plan for living out your dreams in retirement.